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Graham
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« on: June 09, 2008, 08:07:04 PM »



Well now we're out of our misery, Steve Jobs has announced in his opening keynote at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference that Apple are releasing their 3G iPhone to most markets (including the UK) on July 11th for no more than $199 in any market for the 8Gb version or $299 for the 16Gb version. The new object of desire comes with GPS, push email (like Exchange), better audio, improved camera and flush headphone jack (so you can use regular headphones!). It's still slim, light and has the 3.5" screen with multi-touch.

Apparently the 3G download is about 36% faster than the Nokia N95 and there are lots of new applications coming out thick and fast via iTunes.

A good early blog post maybe found here:
http://blogs.barrons.com/techtraderdaily/2008/06/09/apple-blogging-the-wwdc-here-comes-3g-iphone/

and here:
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2008/06/meta_liveblog_o.html
http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/iphone
http://www.engadget.com/2008/06/09/iphone-3g-is-finally-official/

I would suggest Apple have another winner on their mitts, now we just need a version with a low cost data plan for the education sector Wink
« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 08:09:07 PM by Graham » Logged
James Clay
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« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2008, 07:05:35 AM »

New features include:

Quote
- contact searching
- complete iWork document support
- complete Office document support (now includes PowerPoint)
- bulk delete and move for Mail
- save images you receive
- scientific calculator in landscape mode
- parental controls
- language

I wonder if the Keynote and PowerPoint support also allows you to show the presentation via an AV cable in the same way you can do at the moment with video and images.

Interesting to see also if iWork (or even Office) support includes editing and creating support, or is it just going to be reading, I suspect the latter.

I do like the fact that an educational institution can put apps on the iPhone without needing to go through the Apple process  and the iTunes App store.

Downside is that you now need to activate the phone in store, so now unlocking just became a lot more expensive as you will have to  buy into a phone plan as well as the phone.
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James Clay
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Stuart Smith, University of Manchester

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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2008, 05:39:59 PM »

Here is my problem I want an Iphone, they look great and everyone who has one seems to love it. Until now I used the 2G, poor camera etc. as a good excuse not to get one but thats gone. But I still don't like the way a knife is held to throat with regards to service provision. I am still amazed they can get away with it!
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Graham
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2008, 10:54:42 AM »

That's a fair point Stuart but I think Apple are getting a bit closer to what we take for granted in the UK but is less common outside it, i.e. where phones are heavily subsidised and available across networks.

At least now the iPhone is more affordable. Other manufacturers also do exclusive deals on certain models that are linked to either certain service providers or reseller networks. I think Apple also achieved something when they didn't capitulate to the demands of service providers who historically have held a knife to the neck of device manufacturers by controlling access to the market which in the computer world would have been akin to having your ISP design/specify your computer.

Steve Job's keynote can be seen here:
http://events.apple.com.edgesuite.net/0806wdt546x/event/index.html

You'll hear the whoops of delight even when he announces a revised headphone jack!
 Grin
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Graham
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2008, 02:47:14 PM »

I wonder if the Keynote and PowerPoint support also allows you to show the presentation via an AV cable in the same way you can do at the moment with video and images.

I suspect that until a developer comes up with a Keynote/Powerpoint player app then you'll have to email yourself the presentation and then view it via the mail app on the iPhone while connecting it to a projector using either the component or composite video accessory (£35). Although we'd lose the nice transitions that Keynote provides.

I can't wait to be honest, as gradually the only reason why I tend to lug a laptop around has been to do presentations and it would be great to pitch-up to an event and just plug my iPhone in. Often I find myself out and about doing a lot of day to day things, writing, email, etc via my phone (including writing here!). If I could do more and more things whilst accessing all of my files online (and iPhone VNC app would be handy) then I'd feel much more mobile.
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stu_mob
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« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2008, 03:03:19 PM »

Graham you are right  the mobile phone industry is full of 'unhelpful' practices, which in many cases are unfair and definitely stifling to the uptake of the device in education.

I think the most exciting thing about the Iphone is it has affected the industry fundamentally and although it was not the first to do so, it is the first to be noticed on a large scale to bring some of the functionality normally reserved for business phones on to a consumer phone.

It'll be interesting to see if Nokia's response later this years measures up and of course to see how Android makes an impact.
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James Clay
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2008, 07:27:20 PM »

I suspect that until a developer comes up with a Keynote/Powerpoint player app then you'll have to email yourself the presentation and then view it via the mail app on the iPhone while connecting it to a projector using either the component or composite video accessory (£35). Although we'd lose the nice transitions that Keynote provides.


Native Keynote support would be nice.

However I guess I can continue exporting my presentation as a Quicktime movie and present that way, I just need to know when to pause.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/BCLf5jV8AXQ&amp;rel=0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/BCLf5jV8AXQ&rel=0</a>
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James Clay
Gloucestershire College
Graham
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2008, 07:53:55 PM »

Good thinking James!
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James Clay
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« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2008, 12:33:52 PM »

Amusing accessory.

http://tinyurl.com/64arod
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James Clay
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Graham
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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2008, 02:34:18 PM »

Lol!

Actually I think there genuinely was a company that made a contraption to enable iPhone video conferencing. It still show's a key limitation in the iPhone even if in an amusing way. Now with 3G it would be great if the iPhone had a method of doing video conferencing that we are now mostly familiar with on our laptops and many other mobile phones, i.e. with a camera in the front as well as the back.

I wonder how long it will be before a bright spark comes up with a periscope style add-on that uses internal mirrors that you can clamp on the iPhone?

By the time, we've added an external battery pack (I rarely get my iPhone to last all day without a top-up although, granted I'm a heavy user) those attractive lines of the iPhone begin to diminish...

I caught an interesting article in the online version of PC Mag where it is asking if Apple is set for world domination in the handheld computer/mobile phone space:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2320072,00.asp

Quote

When the new iPhone was launched this week, most of the folks covering it focused on the 3G radio and the low price. To be fair, some of the media did talk about the software, but I can't emphasize enough the fact that it is the software, coupled with a PC-class OS and Web browser, that will help make the iPhone the most portable computer on the market today—or even tomorrow.

Why is this important? Think about the original PC. It was a great box, but pretty much worthless without software. In fact, it took VisiCalc, the first spreadsheet, to show the world that the Apple II was not a toy. And it took Lotus 1-2-3 and WordStar to make the original IBM PC a business workhorse. Most PC watchers agree that software really drove the PC industry back then as well as today.

Apple clearly understands how important software is to PCs, as evidenced by the various 1,000 or so sessions this week at the developers' conference, where 5,200 developers gathered to learn more about creating great software for the Mac and the iPhone. And while developing for the Mac is important, the development of iPhone software is what I consider critical to Apple's real long-term growth.

If Apple successfully creates a portable computing platform that delivers a true PC experience in the form of something that fits into your pocket and sells at an affordable price, it could emerge as the number one player in this segment pretty quickly. The iPhone, with its PC-class OS and browser, combined with services like iTunes and the soon-to-be-launched iPhone app store, create an ecosystem of hardware, software, and services that will make it very difficult for competitors to respond in kind quickly.

Let's put this into some numerical perspective. There are now three billion cell phones in use worldwide, and I expect that to grow to 4.2 billion by 2010. Approximately 1.3 billion new cell phones are sold each year. Today, 93 percent of these cell phones are basic cell phones, although a lot of them do have cameras and some simple media features. We are forecasting, however, that by 2010 28 percent of all cell phones sold will be smartphones/multimedia phones and by 2012, 47 percent of all cell phones will be in this category. If cell phones keep selling at these numbers, there could be as many as 600 to 700 million smartphones/multimedia phones in use by 2012.




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