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danmoorhouse
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« on: February 05, 2008, 10:19:58 AM »

A colleague yesterday mentioned automated text messages that he received when walked past several shops in Newcastle. He was quite interested in investigating ways of applying that kind of technoogy in his school, to send things like the thought for the day, urgent items of news, or departmental messages as pupils entered his faculty. As I've never had the joyof receiving a text in that way, I thought I'd ask on here to see if anyone has any ideas about how to set that sort of thing up. A quick google has returned nothing of use...

Thanks in advance
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wolfluecker
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2008, 11:05:40 AM »

Could you give us a bit more information about that?. Not doubting your colleague, but what they're describing is not really possible.

To receive an SMS message, the shop would need your colleague's phone number, which it is very unlikely to have, unless they consented in some way. What I suspect is happening is that they are receiving Bluetooth messages ("Bluecasting", which is actually a company) which will be fired indiscriminately at any device in the vicinity with Bluetooth visibility switched on. There are various providers of this sort of service for events, shops etc. For marketing people Bluecasting is clearly very exciting, although it doesn't havea great reputation as you can imagine - it is quite intrusive and since it's not authorized by the user, it can be perceived as very annoying.

Motion-triggering could be involved (as in a sensor checking that there's someone in front of the shop window), but it's probably more the Bluecasting device scanning for open devices. Their range varies, but it's obviously not very long.

Wolf.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2008, 11:18:53 AM by wolfluecker » Logged
Michael Wilkinson
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2008, 12:57:37 PM »

I'm with Wolf on this one.
If you are interested in this 'on location / in context' approach, the likes of GPS based systems and even RFID can be far more effective, less intrusive and indeed safer than bluecasting.
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danmoorhouse
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2008, 01:39:39 PM »

I'm assuming that you're both right on it being bluetooth based.

His description was quite short - literally a case of walking through a shopping centre and receiving a message from shops as he walked past. I'll take a look at Bluecasting and the RFID suggestions, see if there's anything he can use.

NB: Michael - lots of interest in the .mobi from the HA project participants - e-mail will be winging its way to you later on.

Thanks
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jont
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2008, 01:48:45 PM »


Lillian talked about this system at hhl last year
http://www.xlearn.co.uk/sms.htm


Jon
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stu_mob
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2008, 04:16:33 PM »

I am big fan of bluetoothing and often use a bluetooth server to share materials in my workshops and presentations. It's very useful, low cost and will allow materials to be sent by a variety of devices.

Stu
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lilsk
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2008, 09:03:45 PM »

If interested, you can download a trial copy of a Bluetooth broadcast software from http://www.fantasticmedia.net/bluebroadcaster. The full copy is 75 (incl VAT and a 150m dongle).This is the one I have used in my workshops.
Stu uses a Mac to broadcast during this workshops; this is part of the Apple Mac functionality. PC users have to install an extra piece of software if they want to broadcast (as opposed to sending it to one device at a time).
Even if your PC or laptop has a Bluetooth radio on it, you will still need a USB Bluetooth dongle for the above software to work. I will be trying this out at a college with learners as they walk through the door and doing a bit of research on their reactions, how many students actually have Bluetooth turned on, and what kind of things they would like to receive on their phones.
It won't have been a text message that people received on their phones, as others have rightly said. It may have been a html text page which can be read by most phones these days.
Some useful ideas would include sending further links or phone numbers to learners so they always have the information that you want them to have: with them on their phone!
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jont
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2008, 07:26:01 AM »

Bluetooth posters like this now at Stirling station
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/tayside_and_central/7228905.stm
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epokh
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« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2008, 09:04:36 PM »

There's a company whose name I can't remember that use a GSM tracker, to monitor the customer position inside the shop!
But finding I don't know if is possible to get the IMSI and number just sniffing the traffic and consequently send sms.
I'll ask an opinion to an expert and see if is possible.
About advertising:
in korea and china, they use rfid to advertise.
Basically shops install a transmitter (rfid tag) with a message, buses or taxis have a receiver (rfid reader) and when get in proximity the message is streamed into the speakers of the mean of transport.
Also bluetooth is quite common.
 
« Last Edit: May 25, 2008, 09:16:04 PM by epokh » Logged

wolfluecker
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« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2008, 08:43:34 PM »

There's a company whose name I can't remember that use a GSM tracker, to monitor the customer position inside the shop!


Let me get that straight, they monitor GSM signals in their shop? I'm not a telecoms lawyer but that's illegal I think. They could listen to your conversations that way. Same thing for getting IMEI or subscriber phone numbers: nobody is allowed to 'sniff' those, that's ID theft!

...unless of course they have asked the customers for their numbers and have been given them voluntarily. Then I suppose they could use cell triangulation to roughly tell where a person is. Not that accurate in a small area like a shop though.

For that sort of thing RFID/NFC will be ideal. You could walk through a doorway and get an instant message on your phone. We would need more than the 2 devices currently on the market to start with (wait, Nokia have just released another)...

W
 

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epokh
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« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2008, 05:20:08 PM »

I'm googling and googling again but can't really retrieve it.
Yes of course is not legal. But nobody will raise an hand for the sake of privacy.
My friend suggest:
Quote
it could be a GSM base statation in a man in the middle configuration or also in a listening mode.
The technical problem in retrieving the mobile number is that during the handshaking section only the IMSI is exchanged (well to be fair the IMSI is quickly changed with the TMSI) and not the mobile phone. Therefore they are not able to retrieve sms unless they don't have access to the provider lookup table of IMSI -> phone number

I'll have a look at the nokia NFC.  Smiley

GOT the company again:
http://www.pathintelligence.com/
and Information Commissioner's Office already asked some info about the technology and the company replied that they only can get the IMSI.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2008, 05:42:12 PM by epokh » Logged

wolfluecker
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« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2008, 06:18:39 PM »

So we're talking about properly 'tapping' a mobile phone, as in IMSI-catching. You say 'nobody will raise a hand for privacy', but this is something only the police/intelligence agencies etc are allowed to do in a criminal investigation.

I cannot believe that this company has based its business model (and received Silicon Valley VC money) on an illegal activity. They surely must do it in some other way. Terrifying business concept too: They want to track you as you walk around the shops and build up a record of exactly where you went and when, all completely unknown to you, in the name of market research.

What is the world coming to...?
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Graham
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« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2008, 06:58:32 PM »

I cannot believe that this company has based its business model (and received Silicon Valley VC money) on an illegal activity.

err...YouTube anybody?
 Roll Eyes

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epokh
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« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2008, 09:26:19 PM »

Humm what do you mean?
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wolfluecker
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« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2008, 10:12:30 AM »

err...YouTube anybody?
 Roll Eyes

Don't get the comparison either. YouTube didn't set out to do anything illegal. It was meant to be a place for people to upload and share their own media, and since at the time DRM was still a bit of a woolly world, I'm sure their backers saw the potential in that idea. The legal problems were actually created by what users did with the service - sharing copyrighted content.

If these PathIntelligence guys used the above technique to track users, nobody would back them because that is already completely illegal.

W
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